About CHCI

CHCI is a global network of over 200 humanities centers, institutes, research libraries, and related organizations.

We leverage the multiple perspectives of our international network to shape the future of the humanities, cultivating new forms of multilateral collaboration and generating innovative models for research, pedagogy, and public engagement.

Our History

1988

The idea of a consortium of humanities centers first emerges at a spring conference on The Institutional Impact of Institutes at the newly established the University of California Humanities Research Institute (UCHRI).  Discussion continues among directors attending the annual meeting of the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) in New York, and the group decides to move forward with forming a consortium. Ralph Cohen, founding director of the Commonwealth Center for Literary and Cultural Change at the University of Virginia, who organized the UCHRI conference, agrees to coordinate the new Consortium, with the UCHRI serving as the administrative home. Later that year, a steering committee forms and determines that the Consortium’s main role should be the exchange of information and resources among the membership, which would include all interested humanities centers. Cohen continues to serve as the chair of the CHCI’s steering committee through 1995.

1993

In October, the Humanities Institute at SUNY Stony Brook hosts the first CHCI annual meeting, which focuses on “Disorderly Disciplines: The State of Humanities Research and Teaching in the 1990s” and, in 1994, Rutgers’ Center for Critical Analysis of Contemporary Culture hosts CHCI’s second annual meeting, focused on “The Politics of Research.” During this period, CHCI’s leadership encourages the participation of assistant and associate directors in the annual meetings and establishes frameworks, like the “New Directors Meeting,” to address administrative concerns relevant to humanities centers and institutes.

1995

CHCI’s operations and leadership move to the Center for 20th Century Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, at that time directed by Kathleen Woodward who serves as the chair of the steering committee through 2001.  Woodward consolidates leadership and staff at a single institution and focuses on the first phase of CHCI’s internationalization, ensuring that the steering committee includes directors from outside of the United States.  During this phase, membership grows to over 125 organizations as new centers open and existing centers grow. This period also sees the dramatic expansion of CHCI’s Annual Meetings, the development of the organization’s first website and online directory, and two major grants from the Rockefeller Foundation for organizational development and network-building.

1999 - 2000

CHCI continues to internationalize, holding its first annual meeting outside of the United States, in Brisbane, Australia, focused on “The Humanities, Arts, and Public Culture in Two Hemispheres

(1999) and, in collaboration with the Rockefeller Foundation, welcoming directors of centers in Argentina, Uruguay, and Guatemala to the Annual meeting at the Townsend Center at UC-Berkeley (2000). The increased internationalization of the annual meetings also coincides in these years with the emergence of the first of CHCI’s affiliate regional consortia, the Australasian Consortium of Humanities Research Centers and a short-lived series of online Working Papers the precursor to CHCI IDEAS.

2001

CHCI moves to the Humanities Center at Harvard, where Marjorie Garber serves a six-year term as (the first) President of CHCI and the steering committee takes shape as an International Advisory Board, which begins to meet twice annually. During this period, membership continues to expand, and CHCI’s annual meetings grow markedly in terms of depth, scale, and impact.  In 2005, CHCI holds its first European meeting “Open to the Public?” hosted by the Research Institute for Culture and History at Universiteit Utrecht in the Netherlands

2007 - 2010

CHCI operations move to the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute at Duke University, under the leadership of Srinivas Aravamudan. At Duke, CHCI develops new programs for the membership, such as a partnership with the American Council of Learned Societies and new member groups (later renamed networks) in the Digital Humanities, Humanities for the Environment, and Public Humanities. CHCI continues to explore European partnerships at a 2008 meeting in Paris with institute directors from Germany, Portugal, France, Belgium, and the Netherlands. Following this meeting, the Board builds new relationships with centers and institutes outside of North America.  Meetings take place in Chiapas (Mexico), Shanghai (China), and Bellagio (Italy).

2011 - 2013

A 2011 Officer’s Grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation allows CHCI to explore possibilities for international, cross-institutional collaboration, leading to transformative grants in 2012 and 2013 to develop four projects involving 22 centers and institutes on five continents: Humanities for the Environment; Religion, Secularism, and BelongingMedical Humanities; and IGHERT. In 2012, CHCI reaffirms its relationship with Duke, and Ian Baucom becomes President of the Consortium. During this period, new international projects continue to be a priority, leading to special meetings at the Oxford Center for Islamic Studies (2012), on the Asian Humanities in Hong Kong and on African Humanities in Cape Town and Stellenbosch, South Africa (2014)

2014

Srinivas Aravamudan agrees to serve as interim President in 2014, when Ian Baucom becomes Dean of the College at the University of Virginia. During this period, the Mellon Projects reach their apex, hosting summer institutes, launching websites, and developing plans for sustainability. CHCI also forms a new partnership with the CCK Foundation in Taiwan leading to summer institutes in “Chinese Studies and the Global Humanities.”

2016

CHCI moves to the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Sara Guyer begins a term as President.  In the first year of her presidency, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation renews its support for CHCI, allowing the Consortium to develop a new project for international collaboration, Global Humanities Institutes. A special meeting in Buenos Aires is the first to take place in South America, bringing together scholars from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico to reflect on the institutional and intellectual forms of the humanities. A new African Humanities Initiative and annual meeting in Cape Town, South Africa, continue the project of greater engagement with scholars working in Africa. A redesigned website and launch of IDEAS aims to support the ongoing exchange of scholarship and insights across the Consortium.

Our Mission

We support the future of the humanities by nurturing new forms and methods of global interdisciplinary collaboration.

Advisory Board

Members of the CHCI International Advisory Board are directors of member organizations selected both for their individual qualifications and the need for intellectual, regional, and institutional representation within the Consortium. Beyond their administrative responsibilities—including the supervision of CHCI finances, grants, staff, and meetings—Board members provide the intellectual leadership that is key to identifying emerging opportunities for international collaborations with a transformative effect on scholarly inquiry and conversation on major issues of public concern in the 21st century.

See advisory board members

Sara Guyer, President

Director, Center for the Humanities
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Sara Guyer, President

Director, Center for the Humanities
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Sara Guyer is Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she has directed the Center for the Humanities since 2008. She is committed to research and thinking that reaches across institutional lines both within and beyond the university – and includes the sciences, arts, and professions. As Director of the Center for the Humanities, she has drawn upon critical theory to develop programs through which both established and emerging scholars can shape public life. As a scholar of literature, she has demonstrated the ongoing relevance of romanticism and poetry for thinking about the major social and philosophical issues of our time, including survival, the human after humanism, memory and memorialization, geographic displacement, and public life. She is the author of Romanticism After Auschwitz (Stanford, 2007) and Reading With John Clare: Biopoetics, Sovereignty, Romanticism (Fordham UP, 2015), and multiple articles on historical and contemporary romanticisms. With Brian McGrath she co-edits the Fordham Univesity Press book series Lit Z. Prior to her arrival in Madison, Guyer studied at Brandeis, Oxford, Warwick, and Berkeley, and taught at UC-Irvine and the University of Oregon.  She is the recipient of WARF Vilas and Romnes Awards, the Howard Foundation Fellowship, and the Borghesi Family Faculty Fellowship in the College of Letters & Science.

Jean Allman

Director, Center for the Humanities
Washington University in St. Louis

Jean Allman

Director, Center for the Humanities
Washington University in St. Louis

Jean Allman is the J.H. Hexter Professor in the Humanities and the Director of the Center for the Humanities at Washington University in Saint Louis. Her area of specialization is West African history. She has spent considerable time in Ghana as a research scholar since the 1980s, affiliated with the University of Ghana’s Institute of African Studies and its Department of History. Allman’s research has been supported by the NEH, the ACLS, Fulbright-Hays and the SSRC. Her recent books include Tongnaab: The History of a West African God and Fashioning Africa: Power and the Politics of Dress. Allman is currently working on a book project tentatively entitled, “A Country of the Future: Ghana and the Making of the Post-Colonial World.” Before coming to Washington University, Allman directed the University of Illinois’ Title VI Center for African Studies. She has served on the Board of Directors of the African Studies Association and as treasurer of the Association for the Study of the Worldwide African Diaspora (ASWAD). She is the Vice President and incoming President (2017-2018) of the African Studies Association. In addition to her scholarly and administrative work, she has co-edited two prize-winning African history book series and served as co-editor of the “Journal of Women’s History” for six years.

Amanda Anderson

Director, Cogut Center for the Humanities
Brown University

Amanda Anderson is the Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Humanities and English and the Director of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities at Brown University. From 2008-2014, she served as the Director of the School of Criticism and Theory at Cornell University (SCT) and she currently serves as an Honorary Senior Fellow of the SCT. She is a literary scholar and theorist who has written on nineteenth- and twentieth-century literature and culture, literary and political theory, and contemporary debates in the humanities. She is the author of Psyche and Ethos: Morality After Psychology (forthcoming, Oxford, 2018), Bleak Liberalism (Chicago, 2016), The Way We Argue Now: A Study in the Cultures of Theory (Princeton, 2006), The Powers of Distance: Cosmopolitanism and the Cultivation of Detachment (Princeton, 2001), and Tainted Souls and Painted Faces: The Rhetoric of Fallenness in Victorian Culture (Cornell, 1993).  She is also the co-editor of George Eliot: A Companion (Wiley-Blackwell, 2013) and Disciplinarity at the Fin de Siècle (Princeton, 2002). Prior to joining the Brown faculty, she taught at Johns Hopkins University, where she served as department chair from 2003-2009.  As the Director of the Cogut Center at Brown, she has developed a new Graduate Certificate in Collaborative Humanities, available to all graduate students currently enrolled in Brown doctoral programs in the humanities and the qualitative social sciences.

Ian Baucom

Buckner W. Clay Dean, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
University of Virginia

Ian Baucom

Buckner W. Clay Dean, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
University of Virginia

Ian Baucom works on twentieth century British Literature and Culture, postcolonial and cultural studies, and African and Black Atlantic literatures. He is the author of Out of Place: Englishness, Empire and the Locations of Identity (1999, Princeton University Press), Specters of the Atlantic: Finance Capital, Slavery, and the Philosophy of History (2005, Duke University Press), and co-editor of Shades of Black: Assembling Black Arts in 1980s Britain (2005, Duke University Press). He has edited special issues of the South Atlantic Quarterly on Atlantic Studies, Romanticism, and Climate Change and is currently working on a new book project tentatively entitled History 4 Degrees Celsius: Search for a Method. Prof. Baucom came to the University of Virginia, where he is now Dean of the College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, after serving 17 years in Duke University’s Department of English as a professor and as the director of the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute. Since arriving at UVA in the summer of 2014, Dean Baucom has led a series of initiatives within the College and Graduate School of Arts & Sciences.

Michael Bérubé

Director, Institute for the Arts and Humanities
Penn State University

Michael Bérubé

Director, Institute for the Arts and Humanities
Penn State University

Michael Bérubé is Edwin Erle Sparks Professor of Literature at Pennsylvania State University, and served as the Director of the Institute for the Arts and Humanities from 2010 to 2017. He is the author of ten books to date, including Life As We Know It: A Father, A Family, and an Exceptional Child (Pantheon, 1996; paper, Vintage, 1998); his most recent books are The Secret Life of Stories: From Don Quixote to Harry Potter, How Understanding Intellectual Disability Transforms the Way We Read (New York University Press, 2016) and Life as Jamie Knows It: An Exceptional Child Grows Up (Beacon, 2016). Life As We Know It was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year for 1996 and was chosen as one of the best books of the year (on a list of seven) by Maureen Corrigan of National Public Radio.

Homi K. Bhabha

Director, Mahindra Humanities Center
Harvard University

Homi K. Bhabha

Director, Mahindra Humanities Center
Harvard University

Homi K. Bhabha is the Anne F. Rothenberg Professor of the Humanities in the Department of English, the Director of the Mahindra Humanities Center and the Senior Advisor on the Humanities to the President and Provost at Harvard University. Bhabha is the author of numerous works exploring postcolonial theory, cultural change and power, and cosmopolitanism, among other themes. Some of his works include Nation and Narration and The Location of Culture, which was reprinted as a Routledge Classic in 2004. Bhabha won the Humboldt Research Award 2016 and holds honorary degrees from Université Paris 8, Freie Universität Berlin, and University College London.

Rosi Braidotti

Director, Centre for the Humanities
Utrecht University

Rosi Braidotti

Director, Centre for the Humanities
Utrecht University

Braidotti, who holds Italian and Australian citizenship, was born in Italy and grew up in Australia, where she received degrees from the Australian National University in Canberra in 1977 and was awarded the University Medal in Philosophy and the University Tillyard prize. Braidotti then moved on to do her doctoral work at the Sorbonne, where she received her degree in philosophy in 1981. She has taught at the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands since 1988, when she was appointed as the founding professor in women's studies. In 1995 she became the founding Director of the Netherlands research school of Women's Studies, a position she held till 2005.

Braidotti is a pioneer in European Women's Studies: she founded the inter-university SOCRATES network NOISE and the Thematic Network for Women's Studies ATHENA, which she directed till 2005. She was a Leverhulme Trust Visiting Professor at Birkbeck College in 2005-6; a Jean Monnet professor at the European University Institute in Florence in 2002-3 and a fellow in the school of Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton in 1994. Braidotti is currently Distinguished University Professor at Utrecht University and founding Director of the Centre for the Humanities.

Judith Buchanan

Director, Humanities Research Centre
University of York, UK

Judith Buchanan

Director, Humanities Research Centre
University of York, UK

Judith Buchanan is currently Director of the Humanities Research Centre at the University of York. She had an academic background in Early Modern literature before retooling as a film specialist. Eventually she held a Senior Research Fellowship at Worcester College, Oxford and taught film in the English Faculty of the University of Oxford. In 2000, she joined the English Department at York as it expanded its areas of cultural enquiry to include film. Her work often straddles questions of both literary and filmic production and reception. These interests sit at the heart of the Film and Literature MA she launched to promote ways of thinking about these two influential media in engagement with each other (through adaptation, imitation, dialogue, exchange, resistance). Through her research and through the work of her project “Silents Now,” Judith works to make silent cinema both publicly accessible (through DVD releases and public screenings) and critically current (through scholarly research and publication). She works regularly with composers, musicians and actors to mount public screenings of rare archival film prints from the silent era in arts cinemas and other venues in the UK and abroad, including at the National Film Theatre, York Theatre Royal, at the invitation of the American Film Institute and in the ruins of Middleham Castle. In recent years, she has given invited papers overseas throughout Europe and in China. She has received British Academy, AHRC and Erasmus research funding, a Fulbright scholarship and visiting fellowships at the Folger Library, Washington DC and the University of Lausanne, Switzerland.

Alan K. Chan

Dean, College of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences
Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Alan K. Chan

Dean, College of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences
Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Alan K. L. Chan is Dean of the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. Previously, he was Associate Provost for Undergraduate Education at the National University of Singapore. His research centers on early Chinese philosophy and religion, especially Confucianism and Daoism. He obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Toronto. His research interests include Chinese Philosophy and Religion; Hermeneutics and Critical Theory; Comparative Philosophy and Religion.

James Chandler

Director, Franke Institute for the Humanities
University of Chicago

James Chandler

Director, Franke Institute for the Humanities
University of Chicago

James Chandler is the Director of the Franke Institute for the Humanities at the University of Chicago.  He is also Barbara E. and Richard J. Franke Distinguished Service Professor in the Department of English, founder and Director of the Center for Disciplinary Innovation, and former Chair of the Department of Cinema and Media Studies.  His research interests include British and Irish literature since the early Enlightenment, American cinema, the politics of interpretation, the history of humanities disciplines, and the relationship of literary criticism to film criticism. 

​Javier Durán

Director, Confluencenter for Creative Inquiry
University of Arizona, Tucson

​Javier Durán

Director, Confluencenter for Creative Inquiry
University of Arizona, Tucson

Javier D Durán, Director of the Confluence Humanities Center and Professor of Spanish and Border Studies, is a specialist in cultural and literary studies along the U.S.-Mexico border. He is a native of the Arizona-Sonora desert region. Prof. Durán’s areas of teaching and research include U.S.-Mexican border studies, Latin American women writers, Mexican literature and culture, and Chicana/Chicano-Latina/Latino narrative. He has received several research grants from state and federal agencies to conduct research and implement institutional programs during his career. He is the author of José Revueltas. Una poética de la disidencia, published by the Universidad Veracruzana in Mexico, five co-edited books on Cultural Studies, and numerous articles on literary and cultural themes. Prof Durán has taught at Michigan State University, the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, and has been a Visiting Research Fellow at the Colegio de Sonora in Hermosillo, Mexico, as well as Visiting Teaching Fellow at the Universidad Veracruzana in Xalapa, Veracruz, Mexico. He is one of the founding members of the MLA Discussion Group on Mexican Cultural and Literary Studies and he is past President of the Association for Borderland Studies, the leading international organization in the study of border issues.

Debjani Ganguly

Director, Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures
University of Virginia

Debjani Ganguly

Director, Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures
University of Virginia

Debjani Ganguly is Professor of English and the Director of the Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures (IHGC) at the University of Virginia. She works in the fields of world literature, postcolonial studies and South Asian Studies. Her research interests include the contemporary Anglophone novel, literary forms in the new media age, literature and human rights, caste and dalit studies, language worlds in colonial/postcolonial South Asia, and Indian Ocean literary worlds. In recent years, Debjani has researched the links between globalism, information technology, ethnic violence and humanitarian connectivity through the genre of the novel, the result of which is a book from Duke University Press entitled This Thing Called the World: The Contemporary Novel as Global Form (2016). She is the author of Caste, Colonialism and Counter-Modernity (2005) and co-editor of Edward Said: The Legacy of a Public Intellectual (2007) and Rethinking Gandhi and Nonviolent Relationality: Global Perspectives (2007).  Debjani is the general editor of a recently commissioned two-volume The Cambridge History of World Literature and co-edits The Cambridge Journal of Postcolonial Literary Inquiry. She has held visiting fellowships at the University of Chicago, University of Cambridge, University of Oxford, and University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is a Life Fellow of Clare Hall, Cambridge; Fellow of the Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland; and Member on the international advisory boards of the Consortium of Humanities Centers and Institutes, Harvard Institute for World Literature, International Association of Comparative Literature, and the Bologna-Duke-UVA Academy in Global Humanities and Critical Theory.

Elizabeth Giorgis

Director, Modern Art Museum: Gebre Kristos Desta Center
Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia

Elizabeth Giorgis

Director, Modern Art Museum: Gebre Kristos Desta Center
Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia

Elizabeth Giorgis is Associate Professor of Art History, Criticism and Theory in the College of Performing and Visual Art and the Center for African Studies at Addis Ababa University. She is also the Director of the Modern Art Museum Gebre Kristos Desta Center at Addis Ababa University. She served as the Dean of the Skunder Boghossian College of Performing and Visual Art and as Director of the Institute of Ethiopian Studies of Addis Ababa University. She is the editor and author of several publications. She has curated several exhibitions at the Modern Art Museum, Gebre Kristos Desta Center, more recently an exhibition of Julie Mehretu’s work titled “Julie, the Addis Show,” the exhibition “Addis Ababa the Enigma of the New and the Modern that showcased four artists who engaged the changing cityscape of Addis Ababa, and an exhibition of the Danish Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson. She has also participated in several international conferences and public lectures. She is currently finalizing a book called A History of Modern Art of Ethiopia which is the first comprehensive monographic study of Ethiopian visual modernism within a broader social and intellectual history. 


Simon Goldhill

Director, Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities (CRASSH)
University of Cambridge

Simon Goldhill

Director, Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities (CRASSH)
University of Cambridge

Simon Goldhill is Director of the Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities (CRASSH), Professor in Greek Literature and Culture,  and Fellow of King's College, University of Cambridge. He is a Fellow of the British Academy and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Prof Goldhill’s research interests include: Greek Tragedy, Greek Culture, Literary Theory, Later Greek Literature, and Reception. His latest book is A Very Queer Family: Sex, Religion and the Bensons in Victorian Britain. He is the author of many influential monographs including Foucault’s Virginity: Ancient Erotic Fiction and the History of Sexuality, The Temple of Jerusalem, Who Needs Greek and Language, and Sexuality, Narrative: The Oresteia. Prof. Goldhill directs the ERC-funded project, “The Bible and Antiquity in Nineteenth-Century Culture.”

​Hsiung Ping-Chen

Director, Research Institute for the Humanities
The Chinese University of Hong Kong

​Hsiung Ping-Chen

Director, Research Institute for the Humanities
The Chinese University of Hong Kong

Hsiung Ping-Chen is the Dean of Arts at The Chinese University of Hong Kong and the Director for the Research Institute for the Humanities. Her research interests include child and family studies, traditional Chinese medicine, gender, and the construction of memory. Before coming to CUHK, Professor Hsiung was the Dean of the College of Liberal Arts at National Central University. She continues to serve on the International Advisory Board to the Consortium of Humanities Centers and Institutes (CHCI), as well as the founder and coordinator of both The Asian New Humanities Network (ANHN), and Taiwan Humanities League (THL). She is known for her accomplishments in promoting the study of arts and letters via interactive and innovative working groups beginning with the now internationally acclaimed Ming-Ch'ing Studies Group in Academia Sinica.

Deborah Jenson

Director, John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute
Duke University

Deborah Jenson

Director, John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute
Duke University

Deborah Jenson is Professor of Romance Studies and Global Health, and, through December 2017, Director of the Franklin Humanities Institute at Duke University. A scholar of “long 19th century” French and Caribbean literature and culture, she also works in the fields of cognitive literary studies and health humanities. Her books include: Beyond the Slave Narrative: Politics, Sex, and Manuscripts in the Haitian Revolution; Trauma and Its Representations: The Social Life of Mimesis in Post-Revolutionary France; Poetry of Haitian Independence (with Doris Kadish and Norman Shapiro); Unconscious Dominions: Psychoanalysis, Colonial Trauma, and Global Sovereignty (with Warwick Anderson and Richard C. Keller); Sarah, A Colonial Novella (with Doris Kadish); and “Coming to Writing” and Other Essays by Hélène Cixous. A co-authored book on Trauma and Humanitarian Emergency in Haiti is under contract, and a monograph, “Essays on Mimesis from Marx to Mirror Neurons,” is in process.  A co-director of the FHI Health Humanities Lab, recent courses have included “Storytelling in Medicine and Health,” and “Flaubert's Brain: Neurohumanities.”     

Roger Kain

Dean & Chief Executive, School of Advanced Study
University of London

Roger Kain

Dean & Chief Executive, School of Advanced Study
University of London

Professor Kain is a graduate and Honorary Fellow of University College London. He was Montefiore Professor of Geography at the University of Exeter from 1991 and Deputy Vice-Chancellor there for eight years until he took up his post as Dean and Chief Executive of the School of Advanced Study, University of London in 2010. He was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 1990 and appointed CBE in 2005. The focus of Professor Kain's research is the history of maps and mapping. His books include Cadastral Maps in the Service of the State (University of Chicago Press, 1992, winner of the Newberry Library Kenneth Nebenzahl Prize); The Tithe Maps of England and Wales (Cambridge University Press, 1995, reprinted 2011, winner of the Library Association’s McColvin Medal), and British Town Maps: A History (British Library 2015). In 2008 he was appointed editor of Cartography in the Nineteenth Century (University of Chicago Press, funded by the US National Endowment for the Humanities and the National Science Foundation).
Professor Kain currently serves on the UK Forum for Responsible Metrics,  Universities UK Steering Group on Open Access Monographs, and the Research Excellence Framework Interdisciplinary Advisory Panel. Professor Kain was a member of the AHRC Council from 2008 to 2014. For the British Academy, he  was founder chair of the Research Grants Committee, and served as Treasurer between 2002 and 2010. He is currently the Academy's Vice-President for Research and Higher Education Policy.

Shuchi Kapila

Assistant Vice-President and Senior International Officer, Institute for Global Engagement
Grinnell College

Shuchi Kapila

Assistant Vice-President and Senior International Officer, Institute for Global Engagement
Grinnell College

Shuchi Kapila is Professor of English at Grinnell College and directed its Center for the Humanities from 2011-2016. In July 2017, she was appointed as Assistant Vice-President and Senior International Officer of Grinnell’s Institute for Global Engagement. Kapila received her B.A, M.A. and M.Phil degrees from Delhi University, and a Ph.D. in English from Cornell University. Her research interests include colonial and postcolonial studies, Victorian fiction, South Asian fiction, literary theory, and feminist theory.  She has published articles in Interventions, Victorian Studies, and Nineteenth-Century Contexts, and South Asian Review. Her book, Educating Seeta: Family Romances of British India, was published by Ohio State University Press in 2010. She is currently working on a book-length project on memory and post memory of the Indian partition of 1947. 

Premesh Lalu

Director, Centre of Humanities Research
University of the Western Cape

Premesh Lalu

Director, Centre of Humanities Research
University of the Western Cape

Premesh Lalu is Professor of History and Director of the Centre of Humanities Research at the University of the Western Cape (UWC) in Cape Town, South Africa. He also convenes the Programme on the Study of the Humanities in Africa at UWC. Lalu is a former trustee of the District Six Museum and current chair of the Handspring Trust of the Handspring Puppet company. His books include The Deaths of Hintsa: Post-Apartheid South Africa and the Shape of Recurring Pasts (HSRC Press, 2009) and Remains of the Social: Desiring the Post-apartheid (Wits University Press, 2016), which he co-edited with Maurits van Bever Donker, Ross Truscott and Gary Minkley. Lalu’s previous publications have appeared in History and Theory, History in Africa, Kronos: Southern African Histories, Current Writing, and the South African Historical Journal.

Helmut Muller-Sievers

Director, Center for the Humanities and the Arts
University of Colorado at Boulder

Helmut Muller-Sievers

Director, Center for the Humanities and the Arts
University of Colorado at Boulder

Helmut Muller-Sievers (MA in German and Latin Literature, FU Berlin 1985, Ph.D. in German and the Humanities, Stanford 1990) is Director of the Center for the Humanities and the Arts at the University of Colorado at Boulder, Professor of German, and Courtesy Professor of English. His work is concerned with the interrelations of literature, science, philosophy, and with the history of philology and interpretation. He is the author of Epigenesis. Naturphilosophie im Sprachdenken Wilhelm von Humboldts (Paderborn: Schoeningh, 1994), Self-Generation: Biology, Literature, Philosophy around 1800 (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1997), Desorientierung: Anatomie und Dichtung bei Georg Büchner (Göttingen: Wallstein, 2003), The Cylinder:  Kinematics of the 19th Century (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2012), and The Science of Literature. Essays on an Incalculable Difference (Berlin / New York: de Gruyter 2015). At Northwestern University, where he taught from 1990 to 2009, Professor Muller- Sievers has been the Lane Professor in the Humanities 1997–1998, the Director of the Kaplan Center for the Humanities 1998–2002, and the Director of the Program in Comparative Literary Studies 2003– 2006. He has held fellowships from the National Humanities Center (1994–1995), from the Max-Planck-Institute for the History of Science (1997, 1998, 2002–2003), from the Institut für Kulturforschung in Vienna (2006), and from the Getty Research Institute (2007 – 2008).

Juan Obarrio

Director, Programa Sur Global; Associate Professor of Anthropology
Universidad de San Martin; Johns Hopkins University

Juan Obarrio

Director, Programa Sur Global; Associate Professor of Anthropology
Universidad de San Martin; Johns Hopkins University

Juan Obarrio is an Associate Professor of anthropology at Johns Hopkins and Editor of Critical Times, the journal of the International Consortium of Critical Theory Programs. He is a 2016-2017 member at the Institute for Advanced Study (Princeton). He is a Visiting professor at Unsam, Argentina and an Associate Researcher at WISER (Wits University, South Africa). He holds a PhD in anthropology from Columbia University, and a Licenciatura from Universidad de Buenos Aires, works in the fields of critical theory and political anthropology, focusing on issues of state, democracy, law, citizenship, violence, and has conducted fieldwork in Southern Africa and South America. His research has received support from the MacArthur Foundation, Ford Foundation, Social Science Research Council and the American Council of Learned Societies. He has been a visiting professor at Paris 8, Johannesburg and Cordoba (Argentina). He has published books and essays in five languages and is the author of The Spirit of the Laws in Mozambique (University of Chicago Press, 2014), Corps Étranger (Belin Editions, Paris, 2014), A Matter of Time: The State of Things in Mozambique (forthcoming) and co-editor of African Futures: essays on crisis, emergence, possibility (University of Chicago press: 2016) and Legados, Genealogias y memorias poscoloniales (Godot eds, Buenos Aires, 2013). He has convened international debates and publications on Southern Theory and global humanities.

Jane Ohlmeyer

Director, Trinity Long Room Hub
Trinity College, Dublin

Jane Ohlmeyer

Director, Trinity Long Room Hub
Trinity College, Dublin

Jane Ohlmeyer, MRIA, is Erasmus Smith's Professor of Modern History at Trinity College Dublin and the Director of the Trinity Long Room Hub, Trinity’s research institute for advanced study in the Arts and Humanities. Since September 2015 she has served as Chair of the Irish Research Council, an agency that funds frontier research across 70 disciplines.  In 2014-15 she was the Parnell Fellow at Magdalene College Cambridge and a Visiting Professor at JNU in New Delhi and in 2015-16 the Yeats Visiting Professor at São Paulo University in Brazil. She has also taught at the UCSB, Yale and the University of Aberdeen. A passionate teacher and an internationally established scholar of early modern Irish history, Professor Ohlmeyer is the author/editor of 11 books, including Making Ireland English. The aristocracy in seventeenth century Ireland (Yale University Press, 2012). She is currently working on a study of Colonial Ireland, Colonial India, editing volume 2 of The Cambridge History of Ireland, 1550-1730 and preparing an edition of Clarendon’s Shorte View of Ireland for Oxford University Press.

Robert Phiddian

Founding Director, Flinders Institute for Research in the Humanities
Flinders University

Robert Phiddian

Founding Director, Flinders Institute for Research in the Humanities
Flinders University

Robert Phiddian is an Associate Professor of English at Flinders University and he publishes on political satire, be it in eighteenth-century British literature, satirical theory, or contemporary Australian political cartoons. Recent essays include “The Emotional Contents of Swift's saeva indignatio.” In Kerr, Lemmings and Phiddian, eds. Passions, Sympathy and Print Culture (Palgrave 2016); “Satire and the limits of literary theories” Critical Quarterly, 2013; (with Haydon Manning) “Nearly all about Kevin: The election as drawn by Australian cartoonists,” in Johnson, Wanna and Lee, eds. Abbott's Gambit: the 2013 Australian Federal Election (ANU Press, 2015). As Director of the Australasian Consortium of Humanities Research Centres, CI on the ARC-funded Laboratory Adelaide project, and a past Chair of the Adelaide Festival of Ideas, he also has an active interest the public face of the Humanities, see “The Publics of the Adelaide Festival of Ideas” in University of Toronto Quarterly (2016). He also writes fairly regularly for The Conversation with a column on Satire and Sense.

Gary Tomlinson

Director, Whitney Humanities Center
Yale University

Gary Tomlinson

Director, Whitney Humanities Center
Yale University

Gary Tomlinson is Director of the Whitney Humanities Center at Yale. He is a musicologist and cultural theorist known for his interdisciplinary breadth; his teaching, lecturing, and scholarship have ranged across a diverse set of interests, including the history of opera, early-modern European musical thought and practice, the musical cultures of indigenous American societies, and the philosophy of history and critical theory. His present research started from a concern to understand the evolutionary emergence of human musical capacities and has broadened to an investigation of the origins of human modernity in general.

This latest research has resulted in two books, A Million Years of Music: The Emergence of Human Modernity (Zone, 2015) and Culture and the Course of Human Evolution (Chicago, 2018). Tomlinson's earlier books include Monteverdi and the End of the Renaissance; Music in Renaissance Magic; Metaphysical Song: An Essay on Opera; The Singing of the New World: Indigenous Voice in the Era of European Contact; and Music and Historical Critique. He is the co-author, with Joseph Kerman, of the music appreciation textbook Listen, now in its eighth edition.
 
Tomlinson has garnered prizes from the American Musicological Society, ASCAP, the Modern Language Association, and the British Academy. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and a MacArthur "genius" award.

Bin Wong

Director, UCLA Asia Institute
University of California at Los Angeles

Bin Wong

Director, UCLA Asia Institute
University of California at Los Angeles

R. Bin Wong is Distinguished Professor of History and from 2004 to 2016 he was founding Director of the Asia Institute at UCLA. He is author, co-author, and editor of several books, including China Transformed: Historical Change and the Limits of European Experience (Cornell University Press 1997) and (with Jean-Laurent Rosenthal) Before and Beyond Divergence: The Politics of Economic Change in China and Europe (Harvard University Press 2011), along with some one hundred articles published in North America, East Asia and Europe in English, Chinese, Japanese, French and German. He has had visiting research and teaching appointments at London School of Economics & Political Science, Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, College de France, Fudan University, East China Normal University, Academia Sinica, Kyoto University, University of Tokyo, and the Graduate Research Institute in Policy Studies (Tokyo). Since 2009 he has been a Distinguished Guest Professor at the Fudan University Institute for Advanced Study in Social Sciences.  He has recently been appointed to the Conseil Scientifique of the Paris School of Economics and serves on the Academic Board of the Bergruen Center for Philosophy and Culture, as well as being on the Board of the Consortium of Humanities Centers and Institutes.  

Kathleen Woodward

Director, Walter Chapin Simpson Center for the Humanities
University of Washington, Seattle

Kathleen Woodward

Director, Walter Chapin Simpson Center for the Humanities
University of Washington, Seattle

Kathleen Woodward, Lockwood Professor in the Humanities and Professor of English, has served as Director of the Simpson Center for the Humanities at the University of Washington since 2000. She is the author of Statistical Panic: Cultural Politics and Poetics of the Emotions (2009), Aging and Its Discontents: Freud and Other Fictions (1991), and At Last, the Real Distinguished Thing: The Late Poems of Eliot, Pound, Stevens, and Williams (1980). She is the editor of Figuring Age: Women, Bodies, Generations (1999) and The Myths of Information: Technology and Postindustrial Culture. From 1986-1995 she coedited Discourse: Journal for Theoretical Studies in Media and Culture. Woodward has received institutional grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts. She is a member of the Executive Board of the national office of Phi Beta Kappa and on the Executive Board of HASTAC. She has served on the Board of Directors of the National Humanities Alliance (2003-2009), as Chair of the National Advisory Board of Imagining America (2000-2005), and as President of the Consortium of Humanities Centers and Institutes (1995-2001).  She holds a B.A. in Economics from Smith College and a Ph.D. in Literature from the University of California at San Diego. 

Sara Guyer, President

Director, Center for the Humanities
University of Wisconsin-Madison
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Jean Allman

Director, Center for the Humanities
Washington University in St. Louis
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Ian Baucom

Buckner W. Clay Dean, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
University of Virginia
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Michael Bérubé

Director, Institute for the Arts and Humanities
Penn State University
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Homi K. Bhabha

Director, Mahindra Humanities Center
Harvard University
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Rosi Braidotti

Director, Centre for the Humanities
Utrecht University
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Judith Buchanan

Director, Humanities Research Centre
University of York, UK
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Alan K. Chan

Dean, College of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences
Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
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James Chandler

Director, Franke Institute for the Humanities
University of Chicago
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​Javier Durán

Director, Confluencenter for Creative Inquiry
University of Arizona, Tucson
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Debjani Ganguly

Director, Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures
University of Virginia
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Elizabeth Giorgis

Director, Modern Art Museum: Gebre Kristos Desta Center
Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia
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Simon Goldhill

Director, Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities (CRASSH)
University of Cambridge
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​Hsiung Ping-Chen

Director, Research Institute for the Humanities
The Chinese University of Hong Kong
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Deborah Jenson

Director, John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute
Duke University
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Roger Kain

Dean & Chief Executive, School of Advanced Study
University of London
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Shuchi Kapila

Assistant Vice-President and Senior International Officer, Institute for Global Engagement
Grinnell College
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Premesh Lalu

Director, Centre of Humanities Research
University of the Western Cape
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Helmut Muller-Sievers

Director, Center for the Humanities and the Arts
University of Colorado at Boulder
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Juan Obarrio

Director, Programa Sur Global; Associate Professor of Anthropology
Universidad de San Martin; Johns Hopkins University
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Jane Ohlmeyer

Director, Trinity Long Room Hub
Trinity College, Dublin
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Robert Phiddian

Founding Director, Flinders Institute for Research in the Humanities
Flinders University
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Gary Tomlinson

Director, Whitney Humanities Center
Yale University
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Bin Wong

Director, UCLA Asia Institute
University of California at Los Angeles
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Kathleen Woodward

Director, Walter Chapin Simpson Center for the Humanities
University of Washington, Seattle
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Staff

Craig Eley

Membership and Communications Manager

As CHCI Membership and Communications Manager, Craig's work focuses on social media and the web, meeting coordination, and membership. Most recently, he was a Mellon/ACLS Public Fellowship at Wisconsin Public Radio. In his fellowship, Craig worked as the Digital Producer at To the Best of Our Knowledge, a nationally syndicated program featuring interviews with leading scholars and artists. Craig received his Ph.D. in American Studies from the University of Iowa, where he undertook historical work in sound studies and the environmental humanities. Craig has previously been a graduate fellow at the Obermann Center at the University of Iowa and a postdoctoral fellow at the Institute for the Arts and Humanities at Penn State. His email is eley2@wisc.edu.

Upenyu Majee

Research Associate

Upenyu Majee is a joint PhD candidate in Educational Policy Studies and Development Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-Madison). Upenyu holds Masters degrees in Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis & African Languages and Literature from UW-Madison, and a Bachelors degree in English Literature and Linguistics from the University of Zimbabwe. His PhD dissertation examines competing national, regional and global imperatives/logics shaping higher education policy and practice in post-apartheid South Africa. Prior to coming to the United States for graduate studies, he spent eight years with the Ministry of Education in Zimbabwe teaching high school English, and serving as headmaster/principal. His email is majee@wisc.edu.

Guillaume Ratel

Director of Programs

Guillaume joined CHCI from the Wisconsin Center for Education Research at UW-Madison where he previously worked as Program Manager. Guillaume holds a Diplôme d’Archiviste Paléographe from the Ecole nationale des chartes in Paris and an M.A. in History from the Sorbonne. His doctoral research at Cornell University focused on legal practices in early-modern French courts. While at Cornell, Guillaume served as the Assistant Director of the Clarke Program in East Asian Law and Culture, where he launched and managed Meridian 180, a multilingual online forum for scholars, students, and policy makers in the Pacific Rim region. Guillaume can be reached at ratel@wisc.edu.